A Workplace that Cares

An article with the title 3 Reasons to Treat Employees Like Family at Inc.com caught my eye last Sunday morning. I've naturally been thinking a lot about the workplace culture at Raised Eyebrow lately (and will probably be blogging about it a bit more) as we're one of five finalists for the Best Employer award at Small Business BC. But really, it's something that's never too far from my mind.

 

The article was ultimately a bit of a let down; I was hoping for some hard facts or research behind why valuing your employees as you would anyone who is close to you, makes good business sense. Nevertheless, the third point in the author's list, which is summarized simply as "care" really struck a chord with me.

 

On the topic of "caring" the author says the following, "This seems like a no-brainer, but showing that you genuinely care about your people can boost performance when everyone is running at full speed. Empathy can go a long way with employees."

 

Caring about my employees (and regular contractors for that matter) has always been a cornerstone of management for me, but lately what I've really been getting a thrill out of is watching how much our team cares about each other. It really came to the forefront when Anna was off with one of her little ones in Children's Hospital (everyone is doing splendidly now) and any questions staff (or clients for that matter) had about balancing workload and Anna's return always came second to concerns about how her family was doing. With Colin and Ruth's baby due any day now that same care for each other's whole selves, not just work personas is coming through daily. Ditto for the excitement when we get a postcard from Christine's travels through Central/South America.

 

I closed my presentation to the Small Business BC Awards committee by saying that I've recently had the pleasure of looking around at the company I've poured so much love, energy and long hours into and seeing exactly the kind of place that I would want to work. Rewarding really doesn't cover the feeling of satisfaction.